Organic Gardening

10 Bright Yellow Perennial Flowers to Add to Your Garden

Perennials are a great addition to any garden, but yellow flowers specifically add a unique dynamic to the space. This color is versatile as it works well as a bright yellow display or mixed with other flowers, enhancing other plants in the space while  improving the overall color vibrancy. 

Perennial Golden Coreopsis Flower
Perennial Golden Coreopsis Flower

When on the subject of yellow flowers, the standard sunflower comes to mind. However, there are a plethora of flower types that adorn any garden, from bright to soft yellow, adding a pleasantness to your backyard. 

“If you’ve never experienced the joy of accomplishing more than you can imagine, plant a garden.” – Robert Brault

Robert Brault

Here I’ve narrowed down  10 excellent options for you to consider when designing your yard. These flowers don’t demand too much in terms of growth needs, and they all complement one another. 

No matter how small or large your garden space is, I recommend adding these gorgeous perennial flowers. 

1. Sundrops (Oenothera fruticosa)

Sundrops
Sundrops

This is a fun and easy choice for someone new to gardening – but seasoned pros can enjoy this very undemanding flower too!  Sundrops grow in bunches, producing small round flowers that are roughly 2 inches in diameter. 

These gems are a tough species of plant that do fine with minimal amounts of water and fertilizer. Their growth isn’t hindered by tough terrain or rocky soil. 

Initially, you can start off with seeds, but once you have a few flowers growing, you can expand your collection by splitting up clumps and planting them separately. 

Botanical Name:  Oenothera fruticosa 
Growth Rate:  Fast 
Native Range:  Eastern North America
Hardiness Zones: 4-8
Dangers: Poison, irritation, toxic to pets, etc.
Soil Needs:  Chalk, loam, sand 
Tolerate: Drought, rocky soil, dry soil
Ease of Care: Easy 
Diseases:    No risk of  serious diseases 
Propagation: Seeds or flower clumps can be divided to create new plants
Fertilizer: No fertilizer needed
Pests: Hummingbirds 
Blooming Period: (long, short, none)
Pruning:  Light pruning before spring 
Water needs: Low, average 
Sundrop Growing Guide Chart

2. Yellow Evening Primrose (Oenothera macrocarpa)

Yellow Evening Primrose
Yellow Evening Primrose

This is also known as the Missouri Primrose since it is native to the southern and central regions of America. This plant features long tubular flowers that are downward facing. It is a nocturnal plant, so its flowers bloom at night. 

Keep in mind moths pollinate these plants, so you’ll want to separate them from other moth-sensitive plants. 

Botanical Name:  Oenothera macrocarpa
Growth Rate:  Fast 
Native Range:  Southern and Central America 
Hardiness Zones: 3-7
Dangers: None 
Soil Needs:  Medium loam, sandy loam, limestone-based 
Tolerate: Drought, clay soil, rough terrain, rocky soil
Ease of Care: Easy 
Diseases:    No major disease risks 
Propagation: Seeds or stem cuttings 
Fertilizer: Not needed 
Pests: Attracts moths 
Blooming Period: Short 
Pruning:  Not necessary 
Water needs: Low 
Yellow Evening Primrose Growing Guide Chart

3. Yellow Coneflower (Echinacea paradoxa)

Yellow Coneflower
Yellow Coneflower

This plant produces large daisy-like flowers that can be 4-5 inches across. It is a tough plant that can withstand heat very well. The dark chocolate brown cone in the center of the flower makes it a unique site in any garden. 

Botanical Name:  Echinacea paradoxa 
Growth Rate:  Fast 
Native Range:  South and Central America 
Hardiness Zones: 5-9
Dangers: Poison, irritation, toxic to pets, etc.
Soil Needs:  Chalk, loam, sand
Tolerate: Clay soil, deer, drought, rocky soil
Ease of Care: Easy 
Diseases:    None 
Propagation: Seed 
Fertilizer: Balanced NPK (10. 10. 10)
Pests: None 
Blooming Period: Long 
Pruning:  Not necessary 
Water needs: Low 
Yellow Coneflower Growing Guide Chart

4. Yellow Daylily (Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus)

Yellow Daylily 2
Yellow Daylily

This plant has small trumpet-shaped flowers that are extremely fragrant. Its bright yellow color makes it a visual treat in any setting. 

This plant also has an early bloom period, usually at the end of spring and early summer, making it perfect for that transition period when not many other flowers bloom. 

Botanical Name:  Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus
Growth Rate:  Medium 
Native Range:  Southern America, Europe, Asia 
Hardiness Zones: 3-9
Dangers: Poison, irritation, toxic to pets, etc.
Soil Needs:  Grows well in Ballyrobert — but can grow in any type
Tolerate: Erosion, rabbits, air pollution 
Ease of Care: Easy 
Diseases:    None 
Propagation: Seeds and stem cuttings 
Fertilizer: Not needed 
Pests: None 
Blooming Period: Short 
Pruning:  Not needed
Water needs: Low 
Yellow Daylily Growing Guide Chart

5. Golden Yarrow (Eriophyllum confertiflorum)

Golden Yarrow
Golden Yarrow

This perennial can take many forms depending on how you prune it. It can be a colorful little shrub, or it can end up taking over a big empty space in your garden. 

Botanical Name:  Eriophyllum confertiflorum
Growth Rate:  Medium 
Native Range:  California 
Hardiness Zones: 6-11
Dangers: None 
Soil Needs:  Loam, sand 
Tolerate: Drought, deer, clay soil 
Ease of Care: Easy 
Diseases:    None 
Propagation: Seeds 
Fertilizer: Not needed 
Pests: Bees, butterflies
Blooming Period: (long, short, none)
Pruning:  Moderate —  can grow quite large if left on its own
Water needs: Low 
Golden Yarrow Growing Guide Chart

6. Golden Columbine (Aquilegia chrysantha)

Golden Columbine
Golden Columbine

Being native to desert regions, this plant does very well in hot climates with plenty of light. The delicate flower is beautiful, but it does attract a lot of pests, which can be a problem for other sensitive plants in the area. 

Botanical Name:  Aquilegia chrysantha)
Growth Rate:  Medium 
Native Range:  Southern states 
Hardiness Zones: 3-8
Dangers: None 
Soil Needs:  Clay, loam, sand 
Tolerate: Deer, rabbits 
Ease of Care: Easy 
Diseases:    None 
Propagation: Seeds 
Fertilizer: Not needed 
Pests: Bees, butterflies, aphids, mildew 
Blooming Period: (long, short, none)
Pruning:  Light pruning if densely populated in one area or if you want it to grow shorter
Water needs: low
Golden Columbine Growing Guide Chart

7. Bottle Rocket (Ligularia)

Bottle Rocket
Bottle Rocket

This plant can grow to nearly a meter tall and has large flowers in vertical cones. This is best suited to large outdoor spaces with plenty of light and room to reach its full potential. 

Botanical Name:  Ligularia 
Growth Rate:  Medium 
Native Range:  China, Japan 
Hardiness Zones: 4-9
Dangers: Poison, irritation, toxic to pets, etc.
Soil Needs:  Clay, loam 
Tolerate: Wet soil 
Ease of Care: Easy 
Diseases:    None 
Propagation: Seeds, division of root ball 
Fertilizer: Not needed 
Pests: Butterflies 
Blooming Period: Long 
Pruning:  Necessary depending on how much growth you want 
Water needs: Average 
Bottle Rocket Growing Guide Chart

8. St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum)

St. Johns Wort
St. John’s Wort

This plant has been used extensively for medicinal purposes. It blooms in late June at roughly the time of St. John’s Feast. 

Botanical Name:  Hypericum perforatum
Growth Rate:  Medium 
Native Range:  Europe, North Africa, Western Asia 
Hardiness Zones: 3-8
Dangers: Poison — contains hypericin in the leaves and sap 
Soil Needs:  Clay, sand, loam 
Tolerate: Most soil conditions, drought 
Ease of Care: Average 
Diseases:    None — but it is an invasive species 
Propagation: Seed or through splitting the bulb 
Fertilizer: None 
Pests: Various pollinators 
Blooming Period: Long 
Pruning:  Not necessary 
Water needs: Average 
St. John’s Wort Growing Guide Chart

9. Prairie Sun (Rudbeckia hirta)

Prairie Sun
Prairie Sun

The daisy-like flower on this plant adds a lot of color as the flower has shades of yellow, orange, and mahogany. 

Botanical Name:  Rudbeckia hirta 
Growth Rate:  Long 
Native Range:  Midwest 
Hardiness Zones: 3-8 
Dangers: Poison, irritation, toxic to pets, etc.
Soil Needs:  Clay, loam 
Tolerate: Clay soil, deer, drought
Ease of Care: Easy 
Diseases:    None 
Propagation: Seeds 
Fertilizer: None 
Pests: Butterflies, birds 
Blooming Period: (long, short, none)
Pruning:  Not needed 
Water needs: Low 
Prairie Sun Growing Guide Chart

10. Lance-Leaved Coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata)

Coreopsis
Coreopsis

These plants grow small daisy-shaped flowers with lanced leaves. They have the best impact when grown in larger colonies, adding plenty of color to the environment. 

Botanical Name:  Coreopsis lanceolata 
Growth Rate:  Medium 
Native Range:  Southern states 
Hardiness Zones:- 4-9 
Dangers: Poison, irritation, toxic to pets, etc.
Soil Needs:  Chalk, loam, sand 
Tolerate: Deer, drought, rocky soil 
Ease of Care: Easy 
Diseases:    None 
Propagation: Seeds, cuttings, divisions or separation 
Fertilizer: None 
Pests: Bees, butterflies 
Blooming Period: Long 
Coreopsis Growing Guide Chart

Final Thoughts

Growing these yellow flowers is easy as they are tough plants that can withstand harsh conditions. 

Being perennial plants, they provide you with beautiful flowers for many years to come. However, some of these can be invasive, especially if you have delicate flowers in the area. 

Some varieties are toxic, so plant them in areas that your children and pets can’t reach.



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